Tag:Kings
Posted on: February 25, 2012 8:56 pm
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Stern anoints Silver as successor

ORLANDO, Fla. – David Stern proclaimed Saturday night what has long been assumed but never confirmed: He will recommend deputy commissioner Adam Silver to succeed him as commissioner when he retires.

“One of the things that a good CEO does -- and I try to be a good CEO -- is provide his board with a spectacular choice for his successor,” Stern said during his annual All-Star news conference. “And I have done that. And that's Adam.”

Stern, 69, reiterated what he said after the collective bargaining agreement saving a 66-game season after a 149-day lockout was finalized: He will not be commissioner when both sides have the opportunity to opt out of the deal in 2017. Beyond that, he placed no timetable on his departure, but said he would have the discussion with owners “very soon.”

Silver has been deputy commissioner and chief operating office since 2006 after serving for more than eight years as president and COO of NBA Entertainment. He has played a key role in negotiating the league’s last two broadcast rights agreements and the last four collective bargaining agreements with the National Basketball Players Association – and also created NBA China as a stand-alone entity. Silver, who also played a key role in delivering the league’s public message to the media during the lockout, was asked during Stern’s news conference how prepared he is for the job. He smiled and slid the microphone in front of Stern.

“He’s a first-rate, top-of-the-class executive,” Stern said.

Stern's recommendation of Silver would have to be approved by the league's Board of Governors.

Among the other news Stern made Saturday night:

• Negotiations in Orlando involving the league, city of Sacramento and the Maloof family on achieving a funding plan for a new arena before a March 1 deadline has “several remaining points that may or not be bridged,” Stern said. The talks will continue Sunday, and Stern said the issue is coming up with additional funding necessary to pay for the project. “Life is a negotiation,” he said. “… It’s getting there, but it’s just not there yet. And we’re looking for other ways, imaginative ways, to bridge the gap.”

• He confirmed that there is a leading candidate to purchase the New Orleans Hornets and that the league is “optimistic that we will make a deal” in the next “week or 10 days.” There is a second group that is “in sort of second place,” Stern said, “waiting to see how we do with group one.” Both groups would keep the team in New Orleans, where the city is continuing to negotiate an arena lease extension upon which the ownership deal is contingent.

• Stern confirmed that he has spoken with Seattle investor Chris Hansen, who is spearheading support for an arena to attract a team and replace the Supersonics, who moved to Oklahoma City in 2008. “It sounded OK to us,” Stern said of Hansen’s plan. “Go for it. That’s all.” But Stern acknowledged that the plan would require that “we have a team that we could put there.” As arena funding talks with Sacramento and the Malodors continue, one might view Stern’s enthusiasm about the prospect of a return to Seattle as a leverage point in that negotiation.

• Stern alluded to increased attendance, TV ratings and sales, but didn’t give specifics. National Basketball Players Association executive director Billy Hunter said earlier in the day that Stern has told him attendance and merchandise sales are up, and that Silver told him in a recent meeting that league revenues are expected to increase more than pre-lockout projections. “Everything is good,” Stern said.

• Asked whether the NBA would consider aiding teams that lose superstars to free agency, such as host city Orlando is facing with Dwight Howard, Stern said, and “No. Why should we? … We have a system that has a draft that basically tells a player where he’s going to play in this league when he’s drafted, and a further system that has a huge advantage to the team that has him. Our players could play for seven years for a team they didn’t choose. And we think that’s a system, but not a prison. ... I'm sure Dwight will make a good and wise decision for him."

• Stern shot down the notion of adding expansion teams in North America (as if there aren’t too many teams already). But he wouldn’t rule out overseas expansion in the next 10 years, deferring the topic to silver, who said, “We’ll see.”

• Stern took issue when asked to evaluate his decision, when acting in his capacity as the owner of the Hornets, to disallow the trade that would’ve sent Chris Paul to the Lakers. “There’s no superstar that gets traded in this league unless the owner says, ‘Go ahead with it.’ And in the case of New Orleans, the representative of the owner said, ‘That’s not a trade we’re going to make.’” “But that representative was you?” Stern was asked. “Correct,” he said. “And was that the right move to make?” “Buy a ticket and see,” Stern said. “We’ll see how it works out.”

• Asked about reports that shoe companies are trying to steer their star clients to bigger markets – a reference to Adidas’ relationship with Howard – Silver said the league does not have jurisdiction over shoe companies. “But we have looked into it, and we have been assured by the two major shoe companies in the league that the incentives they build into contracts are based on winning as opposed to market size,” Silver said.

• On Jeremy Lin, the Taiwanese-American whose sudden emergence with the Knicks has spawned intense global interest, Stern said, “I just think it’s the universal story of the underdog stepping forward.”
Posted on: December 22, 2011 12:01 pm
 

Chuck Hayes cleared to play

Free agent Chuck Hayes, whose four-year deal with the Kings was voided after he failed the team's physical, has been absolved of any heart issues by the renowned Cleveland Clinic, his agents said Thursday.

Hayes underwent "a full day of exhaustive testing and exams" Wednesday, directed by Dr. Steven Nissen, the chairman of cardiovascular medicine at the Cleveland Clinic, according to a statement released by agent Calvin Andrews of BDA Sports. On Thursday morning, doctors informed Hayes that "he does not have a heart problem" and that "their recommendation is that he can continue to play basketball without any concerns," the statement said.

"I am happy to say I have a healthy heart and have been cleared to play immediately," Hayes said. "I look forward to getting back on the court as soon as possible."

Hayes' preference is to revisit the deal to play for Sacramento, according to a person familiar with his thinking. The Kings on Wednesday rescinded an offer to free-agent center Samuel Dalembert, but that decision is believed to have been independent of Hayes' second opinion because it was made before the final results were known, a source said.

Kings GM Geoff Petrie did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Hayes' updated medical condition. Petrie is said to have been distraught over Hayes' initial diagnosis, calling it "one of the most heartbreaking moments of my professional or personal life."

Hayes' $21 million contract was the second deal voided due to the discovery of a heart condition during the NBA's abbreviated free-agent signing period. Celtics restricted free agent Jeff Green signed a one-year, $9 million deal with Boston but had the deal voided when his physical turned up an aortic aneurysm requiring season-ending surgery.

Hayes, 28, averaged 7.9 points and 8.1 rebounds last season with the Rockets, who signed Dalembert Wednesday after the Kings rescinded their contract offer to him. 
Posted on: December 5, 2011 8:01 pm
 

Sources: Mavs saving room for run at D-Will

Tyson Chandler's hunch that he'll be wearing a new uniform soon could prove to be true. And it may have nothing to do with Chandler and everything to do with Deron Williams.

With serious interest registered from the Nets, Golden State, Houston and Sacramento, four teams with cap space and flexibility, the man who served as the glue for the Mavericks' 2011 NBA title could be slipping away -- but for reasons that go well beyond the uncertain free-agent market for Chandler himself.

The Mavs are in no rush to pony up a max offer to retain Chandler, largely because they want to maintain flexibility for next summer's free-agent class -- which just happens to include Dallas' own Williams, multiple sources told CBSSports.com. While much of the speculation in this five-day run-up to the start of free agency Friday has centered around 2012 free agents Chris Paul and Dwight Howard, Williams' situation is in many ways more intriguing.

"Everything is sort of stuck because of Chris and Dwight," one agent said Monday.

Add Deron to that list.

The Nets traded Derrick Favors, Devin Harris and two first-round picks to Utah for Williams in February and are in the process of trying to assemble enough talent around him to keep him with the team when it moves to Brooklyn next season. Like Paul and Howard, Williams has an early-termination option that would make him an unrestricted free agent on July 1. Williams already has indicated he will not sign an extension this season, just as Paul and Howard will not. Howard remains intent on finding his way to Los Angeles to join the Lakers, while Paul has his sights set on New York -- though he remains open to a trade that would team him up with Howard in Orlando.

Williams spoke with members of the New York-New Jersey media Monday and proclaimed in a radio interview on New York's WFAN that there's a 90 percent chance he stays with the Nets. New Jersey has expressed interest in free agents Chandler, Nene and Caron Butler, but the big prize that would make D-Will's decision to stay on the East Coast a no-brainer would be a trade for Howard -- a tantalizing scenario that could play out one way or another by the end of the week.

New rules that dampen the home team's advantage in offering its own prospective free agent a significantly larger extension -- and essentially take away the extend-and-trade and sign-and-trade safety nets -- are expected to force the Hornets and Magic to make quick decisions on how to handle Paul's and Howard's impending free agency. The Nets, having given up so many assets for Williams, are in a position to be more patient and do everything possible to entice their star to stay put.

But if the Nets are unsuccessful in their efforts to land Howard -- Brook Lopez, first-round picks and absorbing Hedo Turkoglu's contract doesn't figure to be enough -- then Williams will have an interesting decision to make come July 1. And the buzz among front-office executives Monday was that Dallas owner Mark Cuban would be in a position to sell Williams on taking less money to play in his hometown.

Once Williams becomes a free agent, he could get a five-year, $100 million deal to stay with the Nets. Signing with Dallas would net Williams only a four-year, $74 million deal. How much playing in his hometown is worth to Williams would depend, in part, on what pieces the Nets surround him with between now and then.

Of the teams expected to contend for a championship this season, only Dallas would have the cap space to sign a max player next summer and still have room to do more. If the Mavs used the amnesty provision on Brendan Haywood next summer, they'd be more than $21 million under the cap -- with Dirk Nowitzki still around, draining jumpers.

Jason Terry and Jason Kidd come off the books after the season, and the Mavs will want their Hall of Fame point guard to pass the torch to a star in his prime and keep Nowitzki in the hunt for more titles during the final two years of his contract. In addition to Williams, Paul and Howard, the 2012 free-agent class is loaded with attractive restricted free agents, such as Russell Westbrook, Eric Gordon, O.J. Mayo and George Hill -- not to mention Derrick Rose, who nobody envisions leaving Chicago.

So the lackluster nature of this free-agent class compared to next summer's, combined with confusion about the new rules and an unwillingness to be the team that sets the market, have slowed the activity with four days to go before camps and free agency officially open. Also, don't underestimate how the shortened season provides an incentive for teams to pass on significant moves now when July 1 is only a few months away.
 
The biggest impediment to the wheeling and dealing in 2011 has everything to do with 2012 and beyond.

Posted on: October 3, 2011 1:35 pm
 

Tellem's cousin recused from NLRB case

NEW YORK -- Elbert Tellem, the assistant director of the National Labor Relations Board's regional office that handled the players' union's charge against the NBA, has recused himself from the case because he is the cousin of powerful agent Arn Tellem.

Sports Business Journal first reported the news Monday, and a person familiar with the decision told CBSSports.com it happened several weeks ago.

The move by Tellem to remove himself from any decision-making role in the union's unfair labor practices charge likely will have no impact on the outcome. The case, which has been sent to the NLRB's general counsel in Washington, D.C., with a sealed recommendation from the regional office in New York, was handled by acting regional director Karen Fernbach.

The National Basketball Players Association, which continued bargaining talks with league negotiators Monday in a last-ditch effort to prevent the cancellation of regular season games, hopes to compel the NLRB to issue a complaint against the league for failing to bargain in good faith. If the union is successful, the end result could be an injunction by a federal judge lifting the lockout.

Neither side knows what the regional office recommended, and the general counsel could take days, weeks or months to review the case and either follow or reject the regional office's recommendation. A person familiar with the NLRB's procedures told CBSSports.com Monday it is the agency's hope that the two sides settle their labor dispute among themselves.

The conflict of interest for Elbert Tellem stemmed from his family relation to Arn Tellem, the powerful agent from Wasserman Media Group who represents such NBA stars as Derrick Rose, Pau Gasol, LaMarcus Aldridge, Joe Johnson, Russell Westbrook and Tyreke Evans. Tellem has been among a handful of powerful agents who have consistently disagreed with the union's bargaining and legal strategies while pushing behind the scenes for the players to decertify union membership as a tactic to force the owners to bargain more seriously.
Posted on: July 12, 2011 2:28 pm
Edited on: July 12, 2011 2:39 pm
 

Comcast has deal to sell Sixers to investors

Comcast-Spectacor has a deal in place to sell the Philadelphia 76ers to an investor group led by Joshua Harris of Apollo Global Management, LLC, CBSSports.com has learned.

There was no immediate word on a sale price, which does not include the Wells Fargo Center or the NHL's Flyers, sources said Tuesday.

David Blitzer of The Blackstone Group will join Harris as lead partner, according to sources familiar with the deal. Former player agent and Sacramento Kings executive Jason Levien also is part of the proposed ownership group, sources said. Apollo, which describes itself on its web site as specializing in "contrarian" investments and "distressed" assets, and Blackstone are not involved in the transaction.

The Detroit Pistons were recently sold to Tom Gores and his Beverly Hills-based investment firm, Platinum Equity, for a reported $325 million. Gores is a native of Flint, Mich., and attended Michigan State. Harris is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School of Business in Philadelphia. Apollo has offices in New York City, Purchase, N.Y., Los Angeles, Europe and Asia.

The sales agreement is subject to approval by the NBA's Board of Governors.
Posted on: June 28, 2011 6:43 pm
Edited on: June 28, 2011 10:20 pm
 

Next (and last?) CBA session Thursday


NEW YORK -- NBA owners and players will meet Thursday in Manhattan for perhaps their final bargaining session before a lockout is imposed, leaving little hope that an agreement can be reached before the 12:01 a.m. ET Friday expiration of the collective bargaining agreement.

The bargaining session will be smaller than the full-blown negotiation that was attended by more than 30 players last Friday. The owners' full Board of Governors met in Dallas Tuesday, and commissioner David Stern told reporters there that it was the union that asked to scheduled bargaining for Thursday as opposed to Wednesday.

A formal procedural vote authorizing the owners' labor relations committee to impose a lockout was not conducted. However, the board authorized the committee to "act in whatever way they deem appropriate," deputy commissioner Adam Silver told reporters in Dallas -- which, effectively, is the same thing. It's a moot point anyway; Stern said last week that such a vote was a mere formality, and owners clearly are galvanized to use a work stoppage as a means to achieve their goals of creating a new economic system that guarantees them profitability.

The owners and players remain hundreds of millions of dollars a year apart in their most recent proposals, with the players choosing last Friday not to counter the owners' most recent proposal in which league negotiators offered to guarantee players $2 billion a year in salary and benefits over the life of a 10-year deal.

The players want a much shorter CBA, proposing a five-year deal with $100 million per year in salary concessions. Aside from disagreeing over the most critical issue -- the split of the league's revenues (or basketball-related income, known as BRI) -- owners and players have taken irreconcilable positions on how the money will be distributed to the players. Owners have proposed what they called a "flex cap," with a midpoint of $62 million per team and an undetermined maximum and minimum payroll. The players have rejected the idea, calling it a hard cap in disguise.

While the key players in the negotiation continue plotting their end-game strategy with Thursday night's deadline looming, legal forces on both sides also were busy Tuesday weighing their options. If owners imposed a lockout, attorneys for the National Basketball Players Association would have to decide whether to follow the NFL players' strategy by decertifying the union and filing an antitrust lawsuit. This would be the nuclear option, and one both sides seem to want to avoid since it would turn the dispute over to the federal courts and waste valuable time. With a far longer season than the NFL, choosing the courts over bargaining would all but assure that games would be missed in the 2011-12 season.

Also, if the union decertified, owners and players would no longer be able to continue negotiating after the expiration of the CBA. If both sides decided Thursday that there was enough will to reach a deal, they could extend the deadline or continue negotiating even after the lockout was imposed. The latter would not be an option if there were no union.

It was not clear whether the players' tipped their hand regarding a reluctance to decertify by having more than 30 players show up at Friday's bargaining session with matching T-shirts with the word "STAND" printed on them. In any event, it is clear that each side has a legal option in its briefcase that it appears reluctant to use.

For the players, the union has thus far decided not to file a complaint with the National Labor Relations Board seeking a ruling on whether revenue sharing should be a "mandatory subject" of collective bargaining. While the league continues to assert that its $300 million in annual losses cannot be addressed through revenue sharing alone, union negotiators have been frustrated by owners' refusal to provide details of the league's revenue-sharing plans -- a position that has put the uncomfortable onus on players to accept significant salary concessions before the NBA addresses the competitive inadequacies created by the massive gap among high- and low-revenue teams.

Using league salary data obtained by CBSSports.com for the 2010-11 season and accounting for luxury-tax payments estimated to be paid and received, the gap between the highest-paying team (the Lakers, at more than $112 million) and the lowest (the Kings, at just under $42 million) amounted to $70 million -- more than the average payroll in the league.

For the owners, sources say the NBA's legal team does not seem inclined to file a pre-emptive lawsuit -- known as a declaratory judgment -- asking a federal court to rule that the work rules it has proposed do not violate antitrust law. Such a move would strictly be made to assure the NBA a home-court advantage by putting the case in a court that historically has been pro-management in labor disputes. If the players decertify and file an antitrust lawsuit first, they could do so in any jurisdiction where the NBA does business or has a team -- thus strengthening their chances of getting a pro-labor court.

Given all that, the court of appears to be heavily tilted away from the possibility of a deal by Thursday night. So if you like lockouts, pull up a chair and get your popcorn. 
Posted on: June 23, 2011 1:23 pm
Edited on: June 23, 2011 1:26 pm
 

Draft Buzz: Where go Iguodala, Felton?


Executives disagree on how much trade activity will surround the NBA draft Thursday night, ranging in their opinions from virtually no veterans traded to a frenzy. One scenario that rival execs believe still has validity is Andre Iguodala to the Clippers.

The Sixers already have turned down the Clippers' offer of Chris Kaman and Ryan Gomes for Iguodala and Marreese Speights, and a person with knowledge of Philadelphia's stragegy said the Sixers are "not taking Kaman." It's not clear how willing the Clippers would be to give up a young asset for Iguodala. The better way to put it is, how much of an asset would it take to entice the Sixers to take Kaman, who only has one year and $12.2 million left on his contract. Iguodala is famously owed $44 million over the next three years.

Given that pricetag, it's no surprise that the Clippers have not yet offered their most valuable asset this side of Blake Griffin -- Minnesota's unprotected No. 1 pick in the 2012 draft. And almost certainly won't.

Due to his versatility as a defender, Iguodala has a broader market than some of the other one-dimensional veterans mentioned on the trade market, such as Monta Ellis, a pure scorer who sources say now appears more likely to be dealt sometime next season rather than before the expiration of the collective bargaining agreement June 30. Rival execs continue to believe that the Bulls, badly in need of a perimeter scorer to take the pressure off Derrick Rose, will play a prominent role in those discussions once the CBA dust settles.

A long-discussed possibility sending Iguodala to Golden State for Ellis is "not dead, but not real hot," said a person connected to the talks. As for an Iguodala-for-Lamar Odom swap with the Lakers, nothing there -- "zero" -- said a source.

More likely than all of them to be dealt Thursday night is Denver point guard Raymond Felton. The Nuggets are listening to offers, and have been in widely known discussions with the Kings centered around the No. 7 pick. Any possible traction with that proposal would depend on who's available with the seventh pick, sources said. The Kings are known to be split between Jimmer Fredette and Alec Burks. Execs aren't sure who Denver is targeting, but it could be Burks of Colorado.

As reported here, the Rockets are interested in trading the 14th and 23rd picks to Detroit for the eighth pick, targeting one of several big men coveted by new coach Kevin McHale. Among those on McHale's wish list are Tristan Thompson and Bismack Biyombo.
Posted on: June 20, 2011 10:55 pm
Edited on: June 20, 2011 11:07 pm
 

NBA draft buzz: Kyrie No. 1

Three days before the NBA draft, here’s a smattering of news, info, and informed opinion culled from conversations with team executives, agents, and others in the know:

• Sources would be stunned if the Cavaliers did anything but use the No. 1 pick to select Duke point guard Kyrie Irving. He’s the perfect package of talent and presence to shoulder the burden of carrying the franchise to new heights after the departure of LeBron James. The Cavs, however, are more than open to trading the No. 4 pick.

• The Timberwolves are comfortable with the outstanding consolation prize that comes with the No. 2 pick, and will get one of the only impact players in the draft in Derrick Williams. Plus, they won’t have to deal with the burden of having to choose between Irving and Williams. The Cavs, after all, could be wrong. The Wolves can’t. The only way Minnesota trades the pick is if someone “blows them away,” according to a source, and that would have to be a trade involving a superstar-caliber player.

• The Jazz and Kentucky point guard Brandon Knight are a sensible match with the third pick, as Utah looks to replace the gaping hole left by the trade of Deron Williams to the Nets. Some execs have gotten indications that Utah also is considering Enes Kanter.

• The Raptors, who agreed in principle Monday with defensive-minded coach Dwane Casey to replace Jay Triano, are sending out signals that they’re all about Bismack Biyombo with the fifth pick, but rival executives are skeptical. One such exec is banking on Toronto taking 6-11 forward Jan Vesely, regarded as the best international prospect in the draft.

• If Toronto passes on Biyombo, some execs believe he could slide as far as 14-18, and the Knicks, with the 17th pick, are known to be high on him. But the apple of the Knicks’ eye is BYU sharpshooter Jimmer Fredette, and New York officials are trying to compute how far they’d have to trade up for him and what it would cost. The Knicks also like Michigan point guard Darius Morris, and one exec said the word Monday had New York looking into trade-up options for Georgia Tech shooting guard Iman Shumpert.

• One rival executive is “almost positive” the Wizards will take Kanter with the sixth pick, or look to trade down. Washington would grab Biyombo with the 18th pick if he’s still available, and otherwise would be comfortable with Kenneth Faried.

Kings officials are split between Fredette (beloved by ownership) and Alec Burks (favored by the basketball staff).

• The Pistons have a key workout scheduled for Tuesday, hosting Biyombo, Marcus Morris, Tristan Thompson, and Kawhi Leonard. Word among rival execs is that Detroit will take one of those players or Kemba Walker with the eighth pick.

• The Bobcats are said to be all over Chris Singleton with the ninth pick, but would take Marcus Morris if they’re stuck. Nicola Vucevic would be Charlotte’s choice with the 19th pick if he’s still there.

• It’s sort of the opposite situation with the Bucks, who are looking to trade the 10th pick but would take Burks if they can’t.

• The Warriors are enamored of Washington State shooting guard Klay Thompson, which would seem to cast doubt on GM Larry Riley’s denials of exploring trade scenarios for Monta Ellis. Singleton and Biyombo also are on Golden State’s list with the 11th pick.

• Singleton would be the pick for Utah at No. 12 if he’s still there, sources say.

• The Suns appear to be focused on Thompson or Walker with the 13th pick. But this is the area to start thinking about Lithuanian big man Jonas Valanciunas, whose touchy buyout situation is the only thing knocking him out of being a top-five pick.

• The Pacers appear to be comfortable with either Thompson or Fredette with the 15th pick, but if neither is there, they’d take Markieff Morris, sources say.

• Jordan Hamilton appears headed to Philly with the 16th pick, and sources said Monday the Timberwolves have offered point guard Jonny Flynn in a package deal for swingman Andre Iguodala. Philadelphia officials, however, have let it be known that they are not interested in a salary-dump deal for Iguodala and want an impact veteran in return.

• Faried also is on the Trail Blazers’ wish list at No. 21, but the Blazers also are said to be high on Marshon Brooks.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com