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Stern anoints Silver as successor

Posted on: February 25, 2012 8:56 pm
 
ORLANDO, Fla. – David Stern proclaimed Saturday night what has long been assumed but never confirmed: He will recommend deputy commissioner Adam Silver to succeed him as commissioner when he retires.

“One of the things that a good CEO does -- and I try to be a good CEO -- is provide his board with a spectacular choice for his successor,” Stern said during his annual All-Star news conference. “And I have done that. And that's Adam.”

Stern, 69, reiterated what he said after the collective bargaining agreement saving a 66-game season after a 149-day lockout was finalized: He will not be commissioner when both sides have the opportunity to opt out of the deal in 2017. Beyond that, he placed no timetable on his departure, but said he would have the discussion with owners “very soon.”

Silver has been deputy commissioner and chief operating office since 2006 after serving for more than eight years as president and COO of NBA Entertainment. He has played a key role in negotiating the league’s last two broadcast rights agreements and the last four collective bargaining agreements with the National Basketball Players Association – and also created NBA China as a stand-alone entity. Silver, who also played a key role in delivering the league’s public message to the media during the lockout, was asked during Stern’s news conference how prepared he is for the job. He smiled and slid the microphone in front of Stern.

“He’s a first-rate, top-of-the-class executive,” Stern said.

Stern's recommendation of Silver would have to be approved by the league's Board of Governors.

Among the other news Stern made Saturday night:

• Negotiations in Orlando involving the league, city of Sacramento and the Maloof family on achieving a funding plan for a new arena before a March 1 deadline has “several remaining points that may or not be bridged,” Stern said. The talks will continue Sunday, and Stern said the issue is coming up with additional funding necessary to pay for the project. “Life is a negotiation,” he said. “… It’s getting there, but it’s just not there yet. And we’re looking for other ways, imaginative ways, to bridge the gap.”

• He confirmed that there is a leading candidate to purchase the New Orleans Hornets and that the league is “optimistic that we will make a deal” in the next “week or 10 days.” There is a second group that is “in sort of second place,” Stern said, “waiting to see how we do with group one.” Both groups would keep the team in New Orleans, where the city is continuing to negotiate an arena lease extension upon which the ownership deal is contingent.

• Stern confirmed that he has spoken with Seattle investor Chris Hansen, who is spearheading support for an arena to attract a team and replace the Supersonics, who moved to Oklahoma City in 2008. “It sounded OK to us,” Stern said of Hansen’s plan. “Go for it. That’s all.” But Stern acknowledged that the plan would require that “we have a team that we could put there.” As arena funding talks with Sacramento and the Malodors continue, one might view Stern’s enthusiasm about the prospect of a return to Seattle as a leverage point in that negotiation.

• Stern alluded to increased attendance, TV ratings and sales, but didn’t give specifics. National Basketball Players Association executive director Billy Hunter said earlier in the day that Stern has told him attendance and merchandise sales are up, and that Silver told him in a recent meeting that league revenues are expected to increase more than pre-lockout projections. “Everything is good,” Stern said.

• Asked whether the NBA would consider aiding teams that lose superstars to free agency, such as host city Orlando is facing with Dwight Howard, Stern said, and “No. Why should we? … We have a system that has a draft that basically tells a player where he’s going to play in this league when he’s drafted, and a further system that has a huge advantage to the team that has him. Our players could play for seven years for a team they didn’t choose. And we think that’s a system, but not a prison. ... I'm sure Dwight will make a good and wise decision for him."

• Stern shot down the notion of adding expansion teams in North America (as if there aren’t too many teams already). But he wouldn’t rule out overseas expansion in the next 10 years, deferring the topic to silver, who said, “We’ll see.”

• Stern took issue when asked to evaluate his decision, when acting in his capacity as the owner of the Hornets, to disallow the trade that would’ve sent Chris Paul to the Lakers. “There’s no superstar that gets traded in this league unless the owner says, ‘Go ahead with it.’ And in the case of New Orleans, the representative of the owner said, ‘That’s not a trade we’re going to make.’” “But that representative was you?” Stern was asked. “Correct,” he said. “And was that the right move to make?” “Buy a ticket and see,” Stern said. “We’ll see how it works out.”

• Asked about reports that shoe companies are trying to steer their star clients to bigger markets – a reference to Adidas’ relationship with Howard – Silver said the league does not have jurisdiction over shoe companies. “But we have looked into it, and we have been assured by the two major shoe companies in the league that the incentives they build into contracts are based on winning as opposed to market size,” Silver said.

• On Jeremy Lin, the Taiwanese-American whose sudden emergence with the Knicks has spawned intense global interest, Stern said, “I just think it’s the universal story of the underdog stepping forward.”
Comments

Since: Jul 26, 2009
Posted on: February 27, 2012 12:24 pm
 

Stern anoints Silver as successor

suuuuprise??



Since: Mar 21, 2007
Posted on: February 26, 2012 11:53 pm
 

Stern anoints Silver as successor

Stern's only 69? I really thought he was creeping up on 85; he's been at the league's helm FOREVER.



Since: Sep 22, 2009
Posted on: February 26, 2012 6:46 pm
 

Stern anoints Silver as successor

moron



Since: Mar 20, 2007
Posted on: February 26, 2012 5:56 pm
 

Stern anoints Silver as successor

ORLANDO, Fla. – David Stern proclaimed Saturday night what has long been assumed but never confirmed: He will recommend deputy commissioner Adam Silver to succeed him as commissioner when he retires dies. 


That was what I expected to see.....



Since: Dec 20, 2008
Posted on: February 26, 2012 5:50 pm
 

Stern anoints Silver as successor

common guys, is anyone really surprised that Stern would leave the business to one of his own?



Since: Aug 21, 2006
Posted on: February 26, 2012 5:06 pm
 

Stern anoints Silver as successor

Uhhh... Jewish people are a minority John.



Since: Oct 5, 2011
Posted on: February 26, 2012 2:55 pm
This comment has been removed.

Post Deleted by Administrator




Since: Dec 12, 2009
Posted on: February 26, 2012 2:46 pm
 

Stern anoints Silver as successor

....The owners should pick who THEY want, not someone who is not an owner....

Hopefully they think really hard for the next person to be commish.......They should look into someone who played the game number one since the money people who have run the league have done a very poor job......

And hopefully the NBA will have a commish who is a minority.......Since most of the NBA and the fans are minorities......

The last thing this league needs is another jew.....



Since: Feb 2, 2011
Posted on: February 26, 2012 2:06 pm
 

Stern anoints Silver as successor

Perhaps a hyena would do well. We already know a jackass coudn't....



Since: Oct 5, 2011
Posted on: February 26, 2012 1:45 pm
 

Stern anoints Silver as successor

Good riddance, hope this happens sooner than later. Stern is another one of these angry little men with a Napoleon sydrome. The blocked Lakers-CP3 trade was proof that he thinks he knows better than anyone else. No doubt he'll get a nice little payoff package from the owners when he does leave. Bye bye Yoda


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