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Blog Entry

Stern on labor deal: Friday's the day

Posted on: October 27, 2011 10:52 pm
Edited on: October 28, 2011 12:58 am
 
NEW YORK – Setting up the next and most pivotal day in the NBA labor talks, negotiators will convene Friday with what commissioner David Stern described as “resolve” to finally close the gap and agree to the two key elements of a new collective bargaining agreement: the system and the split of revenues.

“I can’t tell you we’ve resolved anything in such a big way, but there’s an element of continuity, familiarity and I would hope trust that would enable us to look forward to (Friday), where we anticipate there will be some important and additional progress or not,” Stern said in a news conference Thursday night after a 7 1-2 hour bargaining session at a luxury Manhattan hotel.

“We’re looking forward to seeing whether something good can be made to happen,” Stern said.

After spending 22 1-2 hours over two days hammering out many of the details of a new system that the league believes will foster more competitive balance, the moment of truth has arrived – for the third time this month. Two times prior, the negotiators expressed confidence they were within striking distance of one or the other key issue – the system or the split – only to have the talks fall apart in spectacular fashion.

But according to several people involved in the negotiations or briefed on them, there has been a noticeable uptick in urgency to finally end the nearly four-month lockout, with the last realistic possibility to salvage games already canceled – and avoid canceling more – set to evaporate without a deal in the next several days.

In a moment of levity that also pointed to the importance of Friday’s bargaining session, Stern chimed in from the back of the room during union executive director Billy Hunter’s news conference when Hunter was asked when the important, difficult moves would be made to finally close the deal.

“Well, David Stern is sitting back there,” Hunter said. “I think he can probably tell you. Hopefully, sometime tomorrow.”

And right on cue, Stern shouted jovially from the back of the room, “Tomorrow!”

In another important moment from Thursday night’s separate news conferences – held only 18 hours after the 4 a.m. ET affairs earlier in the day – Stern was asked if the league was prepared to make another economic move Friday if necessary to get the deal done. The two sides are trying to agree on the framework of a new system of player contracts and team payrolls before proceeding with the final, most important, and interrelated piece of the negotiation: the split of BRI.

“We’re prepared to negotiate over everything,” Stern said. “We’re looking forward to it.”

The most recent formal proposals have the owners offering the players a 50-50 split of revenues, while the players have proposed a 52.5 percent share. The players received 57 percent under the previous six-year CBA. The split of revenues was not discussed Wednesday or Thursday, the parties said.

Deputy commissioner Adam Silver, who has maintained that the BRI split and system issues are “not necessarily related,” said Thursday night that “trades are often made when you have the final pieces of a deal that you need to put together.”

“We remain apart on both, so from that standpoint, we’re disappointed,” Silver said.

Hunter does not share Silver’s view that the split and system structure are unrelated, and those two viewpoints must collide one last time Friday with urgency to reach an agreement and preserve a full 82-game schedule at its highest point since the lockout began July 1.

“You definitely have to have some agreement on the system,” Hunter said. “Because if the system’s not right, then as we’ve indicated before, the number’s not going to work.  And so the two are interrelated.”

But while there remain significant details to be resolved over a more punitive luxury tax system and other rules governing trades and contracts, Stern’s demeanor was decidedly upbeat after a second consecutive day of trying to bridge the bargaining gap in a small-group format that clearly has gained traction and momentum.

The rosters of negotiators were essentially the same as the 15-hour session held Wednesday into the early morning hours of Thursday. Stern, Silver, deputy general counsel Dan Rube, general counsel Richard Buchanan, labor relations committee chairman Peter Holt of the Spurs, Board of Governors chairman Glen Taylor of the Timberwolves, and James Dolan of the Knicks were joined by Mavericks owner Mark Cuban, who was flying through New York on his way home from Paris. Other than the absence of union economist Kevin Murphy (who will be present Friday) and the addition of vice president Roger Mason, the players’ contingent was intact with Hunter, president Derek Fisher, vice president Mo Evans, general counsel Ron Klempner and attorney Yared Alula. 

With negative rhetoric at a minimum only a week after the negotiations collapsed last Thursday over the BRI split, team executives around the league were beginning to prepare for a deal to be consummated. Several team executives have postponed international scouting trips they'd normally take at this time of year so they can be in place if and when a deal is agreed to. If a deal is reached, it will take about 30 days before the regular season can begin: at least two weeks to write up the agreement and have it ratified by both sides, and at least a week each of free agency and training camps/preseason games.

But while Hunter said the two sides are "within striking distance of getting a deal" on the system issues and moving on to BRI, Silver cautioned that the two sides are "apart on both" the system and the split. Asked about the gap on the system issues, Stern said, "We are not close enough right now. But I expect with a good night’s sleep, we’ll both come in with resolve to get closer."

But team executives who've heard this twice before, only to see the talks blow up -- on Oct. 4 over the BRI split and Oct. 10 over the system -- remained cautiously optimistic Thursday. One executive confided that his gut tells him "this will blow up one more time." "

"There’s no guarantees we’ll get it done," Stern said. "But we’re going to give it one heck of a shot (Friday)."


 


Comments

Since: Mar 21, 2007
Posted on: October 28, 2011 7:59 pm
 

Stern on labor deal: Friday's the day

I hope and pray that this deal never goes through, I absolutely HATE the NBA, you wanna see skill on a court watch the college kids play.
If I counted all the blown layups in a college game, I'd need more than one hand. And does skill also mean your 3s only have to be from 20 feet? College ball is nice and everything, but half the college stars can't even cut it with the big boys in the pros. Give us both!



Since: Apr 15, 2008
Posted on: October 28, 2011 7:18 pm
 

Stern on labor deal: Friday's the day

hey noles506 do me and the rest of our proud country a favor and take a long walk off a short bridge, you and the nba.....douche
Do your country a service then young man, and DO pull out... we don't need your spawns in this world. 

 

NBA = SUCKA*Z

These guys aren't even that good ....  Me and the guys i play 33 with in my front drive way are better than these highschool drop outs

My next door neighbors jump shot is LarryBird esqe..... my dribble skills are part Timhardaway/Pistol pete

horse, pig, around the world, 33 what ever and however you want it... undefeated in my driveway ...

So how much money a week did you say you spend on crack cocaine?



Since: Jan 24, 2011
Posted on: October 28, 2011 4:05 pm
 

Stern on labor deal: Friday's the day

NBA = SUCKA*Z

These guys aren't even that good ....  Me and the guys i play 33 with in my front drive way are better than these highschool drop outs

My next door neighbors jump shot is LarryBird esqe..... my dribble skills are part Timhardaway/Pistol pete

horse, pig, around the world, 33 what ever and however you want it... undefeated in my driveway ...




Since: Oct 21, 2011
Posted on: October 28, 2011 4:01 pm
 

Stern on labor deal: Friday's the day

hey noles506 do me and the rest of our proud country a favor and take a long walk off a short bridge, you and the nba.....douche




Since: Mar 20, 2007
Posted on: October 28, 2011 3:58 pm
 

Stern on labor deal: Friday's the day

The Players leverage is that they are an irreplaceable group of employees.  This isn't mcdonalds where you can post an ad and know your business is going to run the same.  While I don't think the owners ever got scared over the players all going to different countries, they know this business doesn't have a chance without them. 

Losses of millions are due to the NBA not being as popular anymore.  That is something largely attributed to Stern's who*ing out of the league with so much expansion in the 80's/90's.  The product is watered down and really has been since the Lakers/Celtics/Pistons faded in the early 90's.  As dominant as the Bulls were, there were not any proven teams for them to face during their run, and it just got worse from there.  Stern screwed this thing up, and is now trying to take it out on the players.  If contracts are out of control, that is also the owners fault, and they shouldn't try to use the players to police themselves.
Finally someone talks some sense.  Stern has indeed killed the league, and remember, the players make LESS now than they did pre-cap.  You get 5-stars my friend and an add - well done.



Since: Apr 15, 2008
Posted on: October 28, 2011 3:49 pm
 

Stern on labor deal: Friday's the day

of course this idiots name is not pulling out.  Enough said there.
lol.

Yea his name is "notpullinout" , that's what he told his sister.  



Since: Sep 21, 2006
Posted on: October 28, 2011 3:46 pm
 

Stern on labor deal: Friday's the day

Please don't let it be so I was so looking forward to not having the NBA....EVER!!!



Since: Mar 20, 2007
Posted on: October 28, 2011 3:30 pm
 

Stern on labor deal: Friday's the day

and by greedy owners, do you mean owners who do not want to lose tens of millions of dollars per year? Because thats what a bunch of owners are facing. Salaries have gotten out of control and the owners are looking to bring them down to earth. This isnt the NFL where you can drop a player for any reason. These are guaranteed contracts.

And if you really think the players have any kind of leverage you are not all that bright. Do you really think playing basketball in Greece for a fraction of what they are making by playing at home is leverage? These guys have no interest in playing abroad.
Very simple solution, don't pay the players that much.  No one holds a gun to any owners head and forces him to sign contracts that don't make financial sense.  What the owners want is protection from their own stupidity.  Why take salary negotiations, a hall mark of capitalism and free markets, off the table?  Salaries are actually down from the mid - 90s before the cap.  Artificial restrictions to trade and commerce, like the owners are asking for, are heresy to a businessman like myself.

And yes, I believe the players have the leverage, and as my analysis shows it makes sense.  Rather than just saying "I'm not bright" (I never understand those that use personal attacks in lieu of facts and evidence), why not explain why that might be?  And if by a "fraction" of what they might make at home, you obviously mean under the old/current rules.  If the owners get their way, anyone but the biggest stars could find bigger contracts in Europe.  Salaries there are not as low as you seem to think (look it up).  Again, no season means devastating financial losses for the owners.  For the players, they will still make millions, but granted not quite as much as they would have.  And remember, we go to games to watch Michael Jordans, not Jerry Reinsdorfs.

I think too many see the situation through a political veil.  Players = union = democrat or owners = risk takers = GOP.  I don't handle it that way, I look at the actual issues, and if you think the players, who will still get paid 7 figures, have more to lose than the owners, which will OWE 7 figures minimum, then I must question what your definition of "bright" is.  Remember, by definition a lock-out is an owner forced work stoppage.  This is 100% there baby.  If it had been a strike I would rightfully put the blame on the players.



Since: May 10, 2008
Posted on: October 28, 2011 3:20 pm
 

Stern on labor deal: Friday's the day

of course this idiots name is not pulling out.  Enough said there.



Since: Apr 15, 2008
Posted on: October 28, 2011 3:18 pm
 

Stern on labor deal: Friday's the day

yeah because after college these kids loose all motivation and eventually become nobodys, thats why there shouldn't be any higher level aka the NBA, enjoy your college career and say goodbye, thanks for comin out!  
And even though I don't have a vote I do have a voice and freedom of speech is something we enjoy here in the good ole USA, ya heard?

Yes, you do have the freedom to be an idiot, and you have chosen to do so..and have done a stand up job, you would make the armed forces around the world fighting for your freedom of speech so proud with your intelligent insights.

Then why do people attend games in the millions? and watch in the millions? No motivation? then why do the players choose to play for there country? Why do they compete and battle there butts off for championships?

You shouldn't even be allowed outside, let alone let near a computer.

"ya heard?????" 


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