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Owners, players still hundreds of millions apart

Posted on: June 14, 2011 9:49 pm
 

NEW YORK -- Top executives from the NBA and National Basketball Players Association convened for a small meeting with their top staff Tuesday to discuss collective bargaining proposals that were made in Miami and Dallas during the NBA Finals.

According to league spokesman Michael Bass, the meeting included commissioner David Stern, deputy commissioner Adam Silver, NBPA executive director Billy Hunter and the union's "in-house staff."

"We're not disclosing what was discussed in the meeting," Bass said.

A larger meeting including the owners' full labor relations committee and the players' executive committee is scheduled for Friday in Manhattan.

With the countdown under way to the expiration of the league's collective bargaining agreement on June 30, the two sides remain hundreds of millions of dollars apart, sources told CBSSports.com. The owners have twice offered to delay their vision of at least a 33 percent pay cut for the players, delivered through a hard salary cap with shorter and non-guaranteed contracts -- first through a two-year phase-in and then, in a verbal offer during the Finals, by adding at least one more year to "soften the landing," one of the people with knowledge of the talks said Tuesday. But once the phase-in period ends, the owners are still insistent on their original plan -- proposed in January 2010 -- to deduct approximately $900 million in expenses from the league's basketball-related income (BRI) and reduce the players' share of that from 57 percent to a 50-50 split, multiple sources told CBSSports.com.

Given that league revenues in 2009-10 -- the last season for which final numbers are available -- totaled about $3.6 billion, the players would get half of the $2.7 billion left after expenses, or $1.35 billion. That's $700 million less than the players' share under the current system, or a reduction of more than one-third.

Coming out of last week's full-scale bargaining session in Dallas, verbal proposals from both sides needed to be formalized in writing, and the union requested more extensive revenue projections from the league since the owners have proposed a 10-year CBA. After Stern expressed optimism following one of the bargaining sessions during the Finals, he said last week it would be a "challenge" to avoid a lockout. NBPA president Derek Fisher revealed the same day that there was "no change at all" in the owners' demands.

Comments

Since: Feb 12, 2010
Posted on: June 22, 2011 1:51 pm
 

Owners, players still hundreds of millions apart

I would love to see a payment scale that reflects a player's contribution to a team, rather than a historical contribution.   I would have a base pay for every player in the league that was based on years of service.   Then incentives at the end of the year payed on a prearranged scale for what their performance was.   If the stunk, they make very little, if they become league MVP, they make a mountain.  If they get injured, they get base plus insurance value.    This would free teams up from paying for players who warm the bench.  It would make every player want to play to make bonuses, it would reduce the super team effect, because it wouldn't allow them to gang up and make money, it would allow for teams to reward players as they see fit after the fact.   Contracts would be short, player mobility would be large.    Owners would pay for what they got, players would be paid for what they did.  Seems fair to me.



Since: Feb 12, 2010
Posted on: June 22, 2011 1:50 pm
 

Owners, players still hundreds of millions apart

I would love to see a payment scale that reflects a player's contribution to a team, rather than a historical contribution.   I would have a base pay for every player in the league that was based on years of service.   Then incentives at the end of the year payed on a prearranged scale for what their performance was.   If the stunk, they make very little, if they become league MVP, they make a mountain.  If they get injured, they get base plus insurance value.    This would free teams up from paying for players who warm the bench.  It would make every player want to play to make bonuses, it would reduce the super team effect, because it wouldn't allow them to gang up and make money, it would allow for teams to reward players as they see fit after the fact.   Contracts would be short, player mobility would be large.    Owners would pay for what they got, players would be paid for what they did.  Seems fair to me.



Since: Dec 10, 2006
Posted on: June 21, 2011 9:54 am
 

Owners, players still hundreds of millions apart

Salaries are out of control. The players will still be well paid with this agreement.

They should build in a reduction in what they expect to get from us the fan. We are the ones deserving a cut in ticket price.



Since: Jul 26, 2009
Posted on: June 15, 2011 11:17 am
 

Owners, players still hundreds of millions apart

I agree Tessux. The NFL is the big dog nad will be forgiven quickly. The NBA although popular doesn't have the same it factor as the NFL. This will get very ugly and make the NFL bargaining look like childs play.



Since: Sep 12, 2007
Posted on: June 15, 2011 8:32 am
 

Owners, players still hundreds of millions apart

The public is going to be a lot less forgiving to a NBA lockout versus the NFL lockout.


The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com