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ESPN stands behind Rose interview on PEDs

Posted on: May 23, 2011 2:36 pm
Edited on: May 23, 2011 2:55 pm
 
MIAMI – ESPN the Magazine stands “firmly” behind its representation of Derrick Rose’s response to a question about the use of performance-enhancing drugs in the NBA, editor in chief Gary Belsky said in a statement provided Monday to CBSSports.com.

Belsky also revealed that the interview with Rose, published May 16, was conducted by a “contributing reporter” six months ago. In the piece, Rose purportedly was asked, on a scale of 1-10, how big of a problem illegal enhancing was in his sport. Rose responded, “Seven. It’s huge,” but issued a statement Sunday saying he didn’t recall answering or being asked that question. If that was his response, Rose said, he clearly “misunderstood what was asked of me.”

“‘Scale of 1-10’ is an ongoing project in The Magazine, for which a group of contributing reporters routinely ask athletes in various sports a series of questions about all manner of topics,” Belsky said in the statement provided to CBSSports.com. “On Nov. 26, 2010, one of these contributors interviewed Derrick Rose before a Bulls-Nuggets game in Denver, and while we firmly stand by our representation of Derrick’s response to our question about the use of performance-enhancing drugs in his sport, only he can speak to his understanding of the question and the intent of his answer.”

For a feature in the May 16 issue of the magazine, Rose was one of several professional athletes asked, on a scale of 1-10 with one being, “What are PEDs?’” and 10 being, “Everybody’s juicing!” how big of a problem is illegal enhancing in your sport? Rose’s response:

"Seven. It's huge and I think we need a level playing field, where nobody has that advantage over the next person."

After the comment began circulating online Sunday, hours before Game 3 of the Eastern Conference finals between the Bulls and Heat, Rose issued a statement disavowing his response and what he was asked.

"Regarding the quote attributed to me in ESPN The Magazine, I do not recall making the statement nor do I recall the question being asked," Rose said in a statement released by the Bulls. "If that was my response to any question, I clearly misunderstood what was asked of me. But, let me be clear, I do not believe there is a performance enhancing drug problem in the NBA.”"

Bulls spokesman Tim Hallam told CBSSports.com that Rose told him he would “never say anything like that.” Sources said Rose may have thought he was being asked how important it was for sports to be PED-free. A person close to Rose told the Chicago Tribune Sunday that Rose believed he was being asked, "How big of a problem would it be if steroid use were rampant in the NBA?"

League officials were made aware of the matter and decided to take no disciplinary action against Rose, an NBA spokesman told CBSSports.com Monday.

Though the comment was printed more than a week ago – and, as it turns out, generated from an interview conducted almost six months ago -- it did not begin widely circulating online until Sunday morning. Other athletes were polled for the magazine piece, including baseball player Andruw Jones (who gave his sport a five), and NFL player James Laurinaitis (who ranked his sport as a seven on the 1-10 scale.)

ESPN the Magazine did not reveal the identity of the contributor in its statement. The piece did not carry a byline.

Asked about Rose’s comments, Heat star Dwyane Wade said Sunday, “Haven’t seen nothing, haven’t heard nothing.” Asked if there’s a steroid problem in the NBA, Wade said, “No. I just don’t think there is. It’s nothing I’ve ever experienced in basketball. Never seen it. It’s nothing that I think takes place.”

NBA players are subject to four random drug tests between Oct. 1 and June 30, and can be tested more frequently if an independent expert rules that reasonable cause exists.
Comments

Since: Sep 4, 2007
Posted on: May 25, 2011 11:44 am
 

ESPN stands behind Rose interview on PEDs

 He understood the question perfectly and answered the question clearly.
Is that a fact or just your opinion?  Are you saying that you have never answered a question incorrectly because you did not understand the question?  Or maybe you where tired and missed some key words in the question?   If you have never had that happen then congratulations.  It happens to the rest of us mortals.  Sometimes more than once!!  His answer was anything but clear.  It fits with both the question ESPN asked of him and the one he thought was asked.

 Why?  You have a better bead on the issue than the league MVP? HGH is banned but they don't test for it.  They don't test in any of the 4 major sports.

What does the league MVP have to do with what my opinion is?  But lets be clear.  He does agree with me so your comment doesnt make any sense.  You should ask yourself that question.  Do you have a better head on the issue than the league MPV?  You seem to like his answer when it falls in line with what you think but when he emphatically denounces what he meant and corrected it so everyone knows where he stands you want to pretend like you didnt read it.  Read below.

Rose said in a statement released by the Bulls. "If that was my response to any question, I clearly misunderstood what was asked of me. But, let me be clear, I do not believe there is a performance enhancing drug problem in the NBA.”"  



Since: Aug 3, 2008
Posted on: May 25, 2011 8:51 am
 

ESPN stands behind Rose interview on PEDs

"I can very easily see him misunderstanding the question even if he heard it correctly" - -

 He understood the question perfectly and answered the question clearly.



- - - - - "I have a hard time thinking its widespread" - - 

  Why?  You have a better bead on the issue than the league MVP? HGH is banned but they don't test for it.  They don't test in any of the 4 major sports.



Since: Sep 4, 2007
Posted on: May 24, 2011 4:03 pm
 

ESPN stands behind Rose interview on PEDs

I am not in anyway trying to put Rose down, however he does appear to struggle when asked even simple questions.  I can very easily see him misunderstanding the question even if he heard it correctly.  By the same token everyone has probably answered a question they thought they heard one way when it meant something else entirely.  I am pretty sure that there may be some use of PED's in the NBA but I have a hard time thinking its widespread.  


sman2011
Since: Dec 19, 2010
Posted on: May 24, 2011 1:10 am
This comment has been removed.

Post Deleted by Administrator




Since: Aug 3, 2008
Posted on: May 23, 2011 10:32 pm
 

ESPN stands behind Rose interview on PEDs

"lol  Wade says he didn't see nothing, didn't hear nothing, doesn't know nothing.  That sounds honest. lol"

  - - - - reminds me of Colonel Shultz on Hogans Heroes "I know nothing! Nothing!"  ESPN is beyond the reach of Stern.  Uh oh.  Danger ahead.



Since: Dec 11, 2006
Posted on: May 23, 2011 8:12 pm
 

ESPN stands behind Rose interview on PEDs

For one I am not surprised.  There are very clearly PEDs being used in EVERY sport, why should the NBA be the one exception?  Although, maybe he thought they were talking about weed.  It is certainly possible that lots of guys are burning doobies before the games, why not?  If you did it often enough, it become a way to settle your nerves and keep from over-thinking.  Either way, I agree with Rose.  But I don't really care.  If a guy wants to jeopardize his future health for some glory now, let him, makes the game that much better to watch.



Since: Feb 15, 2008
Posted on: May 23, 2011 7:20 pm
 

ESPN stands behind Rose interview on PEDs

 
A person close to Rose told the Chicago Tribune Sunday that Rose believed he was being asked, "How big of a problem would it be if steroid use were rampant in the NBA?"


Really? And he only rated it a 7 out of 10 ? Either way, he sounds like a pretty dim guy to me.



Since: Jul 22, 2008
Posted on: May 23, 2011 5:23 pm
 

ESPN stands behind Rose interview on PEDs

"Okakura, I have some land in Florida I would like to sell you. I am a humble man so believe me like you believe D. Rose "Rose is a humble young man and a straight shooter -- both literally and figuaratively" Rose was so humble and such a straight shooter when he decided to have some one else take his SAT for him??? Yea, humble.....bwahhhhh!"



A. I am referring to Rose's demeanor since entering the NBA and this appears to be a consensus opinion from around the league -- or at least from those who regularly follow the NBA.

B. Cheating on the SAT is dishonest...but it is also a very humbling thing to have to do. For a kid coming out of high school to not have the confidence in his academic abilities to get into the University of Memphis is pretty sad.

Not defending him, Calipari, or U Memphis. (I'm not a college hoops fan.) Just saying that people can and do change as they grow up. YouTube Rose's MVP acceptance speech and tell me he's not humble and sincere. No one is that good of an actor.






Since: Oct 10, 2006
Posted on: May 23, 2011 5:16 pm
 

ESPN stands behind Rose interview on PEDs

Okakura, I have some land in Florida I would like to sell you. I am a humble man so believe me like you believe D. Rose "Rose is a humble young man and a straight shooter -- both literally and figuaratively" Rose was so humble and such a straight shooter when he decided to have some one else take his SAT for him??? Yea, humble.....bwahhhhh!



Since: Jul 22, 2008
Posted on: May 23, 2011 4:56 pm
 

Rose's comments are a non-story but...

 A person close to Rose told the Chicago Tribune Sunday that Rose believed he was being asked, "How big of a problem would it be if steroid use were rampant in the NBA?"

I find that to be a beleivable explanation. Star athletes like Rose are interviewed repeatedly almost every day and it is understandable that he misinterpreted the question. Rose is a humble young man and a straight shooter -- both literally and figuaratively. I believe him, and I believe that this is a non-story.

As to the topic of PED's in the NBA, I would doubt the use of anabolic steroids was ever a problem. But HGH or other PED's that assist in injury recovery? Why not? Why would NBA players be any more honest than their counterparts in other professional sports? Are the NBA's drug tests that much more rigorous than the NFL or MLB's? Doubtful.  



The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com