Blog Entry

Spotlight on the Spurs

Posted on: December 27, 2009 10:02 pm
 
NEW YORK – Gregg Popovich was a lot more cheery after the game Sunday than he was before, when he openly lamented having arrived at the team hotel in Manhattan at nearly 4 a.m. – 14 hours before the Spurs were scheduled to play the Knicks.

“I think any team that can get in the night before a back-to-back and go to bed at 4 or 4:30 in the morning and play at 6 the next day, I think that’s a good thing,” Popovich said, tongue planted firmly in cheek. “I think it puts a good product out on the floor. … It must be something that I don’t understand, because trips like this don’t make sense.”

After the Spurs’ overnight misadventures between Milwaukee and New York – ice, delays, the whole deal – Popovich actually was in a position to feel optimistic about his team for once. After beating the Bucks 112-97 Saturday night, the Spurs finished off the Knicks with an 11-4 run in a 95-88 victory. Popovich called this San Antonio’s most complete effort of the season in consecutive games.

The closing run against the Knicks was fueled by the Big Three: Tim Duncan, Tony Parker, and Manu Ginobili. But this season has been about, and will continue to be about, the supporting cast that has changed around them. That’s why Popovich isn’t ready to declare the crisis over.

“We’ve got a long way to go,” he said.

The Spurs, architects of four championships on a shoestring budget, finally took the plunge over the luxury tax last offseason. Realizing that their window was closing while the big-spending Lakers were digging in for another dynasty, San Antonio traded for Richard Jefferson and made this season about paying the price to win.

“The landscape has changed,” Popovich said. “We did it as long as we could, and we were great at it – trying to stay under the cap and still compete for championships. A lot of people deserve a lot of credit on the financial and management side. It got to the point where teams got so good and had so many good players. To stay in the hunt, there was a simple question: Do you want to compete for a championship? If you want to, you’ve got to spend the money. And so we did it this year.”

The result has been an inconsistent team trying to find its way, which is news to the Spurs, who have been a model of stability for much of the past decade. With three new starters and with longtime defensive stopper Bruce Bowen retired, the Spurs aren’t necessarily a better team than they were in the pre-luxury tax era. Just different.

How different? Duncan offered this painfully honest assessment.

“We’ve got to figure out the scheme that works for this team,” he said. “It might not be what’s worked for this team in the past.”

A third of the way into the season, the Spurs are 11th in points allowed per game (96.9), 13th in opponent field-goal percentage (.453), and 13th in points allowed per 100 possessions (102.8). Those are ghastly numbers for a San Antonio team that has built a winning culture around defense.

The offense will come. Duncan, who had only 13 points and seven rebounds Sunday night, is on regular-season cruise control with his minutes being monitored as closely as ever. Ginobili, who had six of the Spurs’ final 11 points, played more freely in the past two games than Popovich had seen him all season. Parker, trying to figure out how to integrate Jefferson into the offense while keeping the focus on Duncan, will do whatever it takes to make it work.

The Spurs have won eight of 10, so it’s hard to nitpick. But they’ve been so good for so long, the standards for those watching them are as high as their own. The most encouraging statistic during this 10-game stretch is that San Antonio has allowed 100 points only twice. The most sobering stat: They lost to the only two teams with winning records that they played (Phoenix and Portland.)

“Look at all the other top teams in the league,” Jefferson said. “You look at Boston, they’re trying to integrate Rasheed Wallace. Look at Denver, they pretty much have their core, everybody back. The Lakers are trying to bring in Ron Artest, but they have everyone there. This is one of the few teams, us and Cleveland, that are good teams, but have a lot of new faces that they’re trying to get into the group.”

Popovich was asked before and after the game how long it should take for the Spurs to become the Spurs again – or become whatever it is they’re going to be. Of course, he said, “I have no idea. I don’t even try to figure that out. When it happens, it happens.”

And if it doesn’t, it could be a long time before the Spurs play the luxury tax game again.
Comments

Since: Aug 22, 2006
Posted on: December 28, 2009 10:59 pm
 

Spotlight on the Spurs

Duncan has been a great player, but to me he looks a step slower...I've seen a few games and he doesnt look like his old self...Jefferson I always thought was over-rated, but to me i think the key is not having long offensive scoring droughts...It just seems like the Spurs will go four or five minutes without scoring...To me the Key is Parker pusing tempo, and the play of Finley and Ginobili...If they can get 20-25 a game from Finley and Manu combined this team can win...I just dont see them getting by the Lakers, Nuggets, or Mavericks, but i could be wrong...



Since: Sep 5, 2008
Posted on: December 28, 2009 2:02 pm
 

Good Article

Good article Berger, and very true. For San Antonio to contend in the West, or eventually the Finals for that matter, they will need to find a way to implement Richard Jefferson consistently. He's been outstanding in some games, but hardly shows up in others. If he can perform well night in and night out for Pop, this team can be dangerous. Granted he won't be asked to do AS much scoring, unless there's an injury to one of the Big Three, but his presence and ball skills are indispensable for the Spurs. I also look for George Hill and Mason Jr. to be key in their run to the playoffs- both have proved their worth to this team.


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